KIRSTY, 22— a new story from Naben Ruthnum on Joyland Toronto. “We made a fake Facebook account at an internet café, one of the last ones downtown, full of Korean gamers and a weird smell of burnt electronics and sour milk. The owner sold liquor mixed into off-brand Gatorade to the kids, who were constantly getting up to piss with their headsets still on. Most of them were skipping their classes at the language factory across the street, where Cory and I had met as teachers. He’d convinced me to quit by the end of my first week.” Read more:http://www.joylandmagazine.com/stories/toronto/kirsty_22

KIRSTY, 22— a new story from Naben Ruthnum on Joyland Toronto.

“We made a fake Facebook account at an internet café, one of the last ones downtown, full of Korean gamers and a weird smell of burnt electronics and sour milk. The owner sold liquor mixed into off-brand Gatorade to the kids, who were constantly getting up to piss with their headsets still on. Most of them were skipping their classes at the language factory across the street, where Cory and I had met as teachers. He’d convinced me to quit by the end of my first week.”

Read more:

http://www.joylandmagazine.com/stories/toronto/kirsty_22

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nprfreshair:

HOW TO LISTEN TO A PODCAST with Ira Glass and Mary

Because podcasts can change your world. Really. 

Meet the Editors: Katya Apekina

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This month Joyland is fundraising for our long overdue redesign.  While publishers Brian Joseph Davis and Emily Schultz work out of New York, it’s our editors across North America who really make Joyland the publication it is. 

Editor: Katya Apekina

Section: Los Angeles

When we were sorting the inbox one day three years ago a subject line managed to stand out: “Untitled Lincoln Love Story Project.” Without opening the submission I turned to Emily and said, “Well, we’re probably publishing that.”  The author of that piece was Katya Apekina. At the time she was working in indie film and completing her MFA at Washington University in St. Louis. Katya was an author on the site once more before moving back to Los Angeles and taking on that section’s editorship. 

Katya’s favorite Joyland moment: ”I don’t know that I can pick one specific moment that is my favorite, but I will say that though It’s been fun being able to solicit work from writers I admire, it’s also really exciting to ‘discover’ stories in the slush pile, the publishing term for work that comes in unsolicited. I’ve been blown away by several stories that have come in this way. The slush pile is also how I was first published in Joyland, and I would really encourage anyone interested to submit. Your stories will be read carefully!

Dream author she’d like to see on the site: An LA author I would love to publish…I don’t know. Joan Didion? Is that too obvious?”

What she’s working on now: “I’m finishing up a novel. I’ve been working on it for almost 2 years, and the end is finally in sight! Also, I just had a baby. So I’m working on that as well.”

Truth & Fiction Episode 13: Megan Stielstra

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Megan Stielstra’s book of essays Once I Was Cool is available now from Curbside Splendor Press. Roxane Gay called Stielstra “a masterful essayist, warm and open and wise.” Megan and Emily talk about nonfiction writing versus the freedom of going to the dark places that fiction allows, and what baby monitors say about the human condition. 

   

Truth & Fiction

If you enjoy this podcast and Joyland Magazine we’re raising money for a new site. Until October 22 you can contribute to our Indiegogo campaign.

Joyland fundraising perk: manuscript evaluation

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5,120 stories.

According to the Joyland submission inbox, that’s the number of stories we’ve read, considered, or contemplated since we started.  

460 published books.

That’s how many books co-publisher Emily Schultz has proofread, copy-edited, and substantive-edited in the past ten years of her career as an editor. (She has also written three novels, including The Blondes, forthcoming from St. Martin’s.) 

When we decided to offer manuscript evaluations as perks in our fundraiser for the very low price of $500 we were confident that we could really help anyone in need of a professional read. If you donate and choose this perk we will read your work, give you a reader report, as well as marketing and submission advice for your manuscript. There are only four of these perks offered.

If you have any questions before selecting this perk, please feel free to email us at: joylandfiction@gmail.com

Meet The Editors: Kathryn Mockler

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This month Joyland is fundraising for our long overdue redesign.  While publishers Brian Joseph Davis and Emily Schultz work out of New York, it’s our editors across North America who really make Joyland the publication it is. 

Editor: Kathryn Mockler

Section: Toronto

Filmmaker and creative writing teacher Kathryn Mockler was an early contributor to Joyland. At AWP Chicago she also volunteered the hell out of our bookfair table. She had an uncanny ability to stop attendees with a wave and sell them copies of Retro.  When previous Toronto editor Emily Keeler was thinking about moving on we all agreed Kathryn was perfect to take the job.

Kathryn’s favorite Joyland moment: ”My favourite Joyland moment so far was the successful posting of my first story on the Joyland site, which was Adam Sol’s ‘May We Be Worthy of the Favor Bestowed Upon Our Ancestors.’ The story was initially chosen by the previous Toronto editor, Emily M. Keeler, but Adam and I had a very lively editing session, and it was a great first experience as part of the Joyland team.”

What she’s looking for in a story:"I’m interested in all types of stories in all genres. Generally I like to be surprised by unexpected characters or scenarios or narrative techniques. I’m looking for stories that don’t have pat endings or predictable ways of looking at something. Catriona Wright’s story ‘Difficult People' deals with grief in a way that we wouldn’t expect and Sam Shelstad’s 'Sketch Artist, Boxer, Party Planner, Baker' describes the loss of a relationship in a way that is surprising in both its tragedy and humor. I would like to see more hybrid stories or experimental stories that push the limits of the genre the way I think Malcolm Sutton’s 'Let’s Make the Void a Better Place' and David Whitton’s 'Dumpster' do.”

Dream author she’d like to see on the site: "Living: Chris Abani. I saw him read last year at the AWP conference in Seattle and his work is stunning. Not living: Kathy Acker."

What she’s working on now: “I’m working on an old feature screenplay called Piss Tank, and my 3rd poetry collection, The Purpose Pitch, which is coming out with the Mansfield Press Imprint “a stuart ross book” in the spring of 2015.”

Meet The Editors: Kara Levy

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This month Joyland is fundraising for our long overdue redesign.  While publishers Brian Joseph Davis and Emily Schultz work out of New York, it’s our editors across North America who really make Joyland the publication it is. 

Editor: Kara Levy

Section: San Francisco & Bay Area

Given San Francisco’s incredible literary history it was the one section where we wondered, “Can we do this?”  Thankfully we had Kara Levy, a Steinbeck fellow and second place winner of Narrative’s N30B story contest. She volunteered to edit the section and since then has documented a whole new generation of NoCal writers, including recent National Book Award longlisted author Molly Antopol. Plus, Kara taught us the phrase “Shatner comma” and life has never been the same since. 

Kara’s favorite Joyland moment: “Getting to see Tamar Halpern’s ‘The House Where the Drifters Squat’ from absolute start to finish. I already knew Tamar to be an incredible writer, but before she wrote this story, she’d worked mostly in screenwriting, and hadn’t much tried her hand at short fiction. I loved seeing this piece go from ‘Hmm, maybe I’ll try out this short-story thing!’ to a piece that ultimately won a Best of the Net prize. Hero tale!”

What she’s looking for in a story:"I love a story with tight, deliberate language — and I’m especially fond of pieces that aren’t afraid of humor. I think great dialogue is so difficult to pull off — so if I read a story that has that element, I’m usually a fan."

Dream author she’d like to see on the site: “You can read a Lorrie Moore story a hundred times and learn something new with every pass. I would be so thrilled to see her work on the site, though probably completely terrified to edit it.”

What she’s working on now: “I’m finishing up edits on my novel, The Believers. You can read a little bit about it in this article by Helene Wecker, who’s a Joyland contributor. (The magazine gave it a very creepy title, but I guess getting your title changed around is part of the writing life!)”

Perk #2: Retro

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On our Twitter feed the other day a professor quoted one of his students saying, “No one under 25 wants to read an e-book.” Retro, our twice yearly print edition, is our attempt to get at the paper and ink-mad youth market. 

For donations of $50 and up to our Indiegogo campaign you’ll get—along with other perks—the latest copy of Retro. It features some of the best work on Joyland from 2014, including Sarah Gerard, Ottessa Moshfegh, Mimi Lipson, and more, with cover art by Marc Ngui. Donate a little more and you’ll get Retro 4 and all the 2015 issues sent* to you.

*For printing and fulfillment we use Lulu.

From Joyland Toronto: “Shape of a sitting man” by Kevin Hardcastle
"When Arthur leapt out from the black the eight men around the fire quit talking. One stood like he was pulled up by cables. The fire burned six-feet high in the quarry-pit gulley and showed the skin of Arthur’s legs painted with dirt and ran through where he’d been cut by rock and thorn on the way down the grade. He passed through those seated on stumps and stooped near the fire to take up a long and knotted cedar limb, black by the thick end. He stepped outside of the circle of men and turned. Little lights yet traveled the wood when he clubbed the nearest man across the brow bone with it. That man half-rose with a hand by his face, soot black forehead torn and swelling.”
Read More
http://www.joylandmagazine.com/st…/toronto/shape_sitting_man

From Joyland Toronto: “Shape of a sitting man” by Kevin Hardcastle

"When Arthur leapt out from the black the eight men around the fire quit talking. One stood like he was pulled up by cables. The fire burned six-feet high in the quarry-pit gulley and showed the skin of Arthur’s legs painted with dirt and ran through where he’d been cut by rock and thorn on the way down the grade. He passed through those seated on stumps and stooped near the fire to take up a long and knotted cedar limb, black by the thick end. He stepped outside of the circle of men and turned. Little lights yet traveled the wood when he clubbed the nearest man across the brow bone with it. That man half-rose with a hand by his face, soot black forehead torn and swelling.”

Read More

http://www.joylandmagazine.com/st…/toronto/shape_sitting_man

Perk #1: Adaptation Studies

Everyone who donates to Joyland’s Indiegogo campaign will receive Adaptation Studies, a novella by cofounder Emily Schultz. Adaptation Studies will be exclusive to our supporters and they will receive it in epub and mobi formats. Below are the first few pages from the 12,000 word story that Schultz calls “a literary noir about film school, amnesia and internet dating.”

*

It came as a surprise to me that I had a husband and a son. Then again I was a surprise to myself too. I’d slipped in some water in my kitchen and hit my head on the stove. At least, that was what they told me. I’d been in a coma for three weeks. Blunt force trauma. Everything I knew was what they told me. The nurse said my husband, Claude, was there to see me. He had been there before too, but I suppose this was the first time I remembered. He came to the doorway and put his fingertips along the frame, holding it as if he wasn’t sure he should enter. He was tall with trim hair that curled a little at the edge of a deeply lined forehead. He wore a green shirt.

“Do you like the color green?” I asked.

His cheeks were wide and each of his features solid. His face looked like he’d lived in it a fair amount for a man of forty-one, though pleasantly so. He had the placid noble bearing of a Great Dane—handsome in a way, but when I asked that question his expression went slightly askew. He came in slowly and sat down in a chair. “Julia…” he said gently, “is that really what you want to ask me?”

I looked down at the blanket and nodded.

“Green.” He nodded. “Green. Sure, I guess so.”

Read More