New podcast: Rachel Cantor

Rachel Cantor talks about genre, pizza and mysticism in her novel A Highly Unlikely Scenario

Truth & Fiction

Cantor’s book begins like science fiction but grows into something stranger, and even more mystic, while telling the story of a future pizza company that has a surprising amount of control over reality. Emily spoke with the first time novelist at her home in Brooklyn, an interview that almost didn’t happen thanks to car trouble, fate, and Rachel’s unique day job, which sees her traveling around the world.

Subscribe for free via iTunes above or stream here.

From Joyland Toronto, “Children of the Corn,” a short story by Nadia Bozak: “Shell and Tori turn their t-shirts inside out and write “Feed Uganda” on them with Tori’s sparkly pens. But then Tori can’t wear hers. Blair, Tori’s mum’s boyfriend, makes Tori change.”
Read More 
Nadia Bozak’s second novel, El Niño, will be released by House Of Anansi May 3, 2014. She is also the author of the novel Orphan Love (available May 3, 2014 as an Anansi e-book), and The Cinematic Footprint: Lights, Camera, Natural Resources, a work of film theory. Nadia has written thirteen “Shell” stories; “Greener Grass” appeared in the Walrus in January and “A Hole in the Wall” is forthcoming with Prairie Fire. Stay tuned for more Shell adventures. 

From Joyland Toronto, “Children of the Corn,” a short story by Nadia Bozak:

“Shell and Tori turn their t-shirts inside out and write “Feed Uganda” on them with Tori’s sparkly pens. But then Tori can’t wear hers. Blair, Tori’s mum’s boyfriend, makes Tori change.”

Read More

Nadia Bozak’s second novel, El Niño, will be released by House Of Anansi May 3, 2014. She is also the author of the novel Orphan Love (available May 3, 2014 as an Anansi e-book), and The Cinematic Footprint: Lights, Camera, Natural Resources, a work of film theory. Nadia has written thirteen “Shell” stories; “Greener Grass” appeared in the Walrus in January and “A Hole in the Wall” is forthcoming with Prairie Fire. Stay tuned for more Shell adventures. 

Another side of Buffalo, from author Jennifer McCartney, on Joyland NY. 

She took Kotter on a tour of Buffalo’s female body parts. Cities were, according to Bea, a patriarchal invention and the urban space was one in which women were forced to navigate in a way that was uncomfortable and unnatural. The Feminist’s Guide to Walking the City also encouraged an awareness of, and subsequent tribute to the working women enslaved throughout the urban landscape. This suggestion was contained within a chapter called “Stoned” which Kotter thought was funny and Bea did not.

Another side of Buffalo, from author Jennifer McCartney, on Joyland NY. 


She took Kotter on a tour of Buffalo’s female body parts. Cities were, according to Bea, a patriarchal invention and the urban space was one in which women were forced to navigate in a way that was uncomfortable and unnatural. The Feminist’s Guide to Walking the City also encouraged an awareness of, and subsequent tribute to the working women enslaved throughout the urban landscape. This suggestion was contained within a chapter called “Stoned” which Kotter thought was funny and Bea did not.


Stories from Michigan: “Noctivagrant”

Our Michigan stories series continues with fierce prose poetry by Detroit writer Meghann Rotary:

“On the other side then” “torrential against the shape of rain”
“I met everyone on behalf of” “the child who brought me here”
“The ground caves in at spots” “and beneath the streets are
seasons” “with their own rooms” “These must be the barracks,”
“where the whole situation sleeps and speaks” “in tongues”

Read “Noctivagrant” on Joyland Midwest

Stories from Michigan: “The Hygienist”

Our Michigan stories series continues with “The Hygienist” (who knows everything) by Ben Hoffman:

“Do you grind your teeth,” the Hygienist asked, but Callie didn’t answer because the Hygienist was fiddling in her mouth, and because Callie knew the Hygienist already knew about the teeth grinding. The Hygienist had taken photographs inside Callie’s mouth, and they were now blown up larger than necessary on the screen. The Hygienist had also scanned the questionnaire Callie had filled out in the waiting room. On the form, Callie had admitted to irregular flossing, so the Hygienist knew about this, too. The Hygienist knew everything.

Read “The Hygienist” on Joyland Midwest

We’re so pleased to have Ben as part of this series! Ben’s chapbook of stories Together, Apart was just published by Origami Zoo Press this March.

Joyland Michigan series begins!

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Photo by Chris Magson.

We couldn’t be more excited to kick off our Michigan stories series with “Rhyme Game” by Michigan native Bonnie Jo Campbell.

We loved her most recent novel Once Upon a River (set on Kalamazoo River in Michigan), and we’re thrilled to have the chance to spotlight “Rhyme Game,” which was initially published in Campbell’s debut story collection Women and Other Animals.

Tinny Marie and her mother rattled along Halfmoon Road in the pick-up truck, heading east toward the risen sun. Bits of trash flew out of the cans and barrels in the back  a plastic bag from Spartan egg noodles, a popsicle wrapper, grocery store receipts. Tinny Marie’s mother had canceled weekly garbage service because she could save money by storing the trash until she had a truckload and then dumping it herself. The longer she saved it, the more she was getting out of her eight-dollar compactor fee. Between compactor visits, cans of garbage lined up outside the back door, waiting.

Read “Rhyme Game” on Joyland Midwest

Watch for more Michigan stories throughout April!

writersnoonereads:

"[Jane Bowles’] novel, Two Serious Ladies, was a revelation—a work of genius, unique, subversive. These terms are overused, and usually misused, but are true of this audacious, brilliantly written novel, this masquerade, comedy, tragedy, with its anarchic, singular views of sexuality, marriage, femininity, masculinity, American culture, exoticism. Jane Bowles ignored the worn lines between conscious and unconscious life; she beggared the realist novel with writing indifferent to prosaic notions of reality. Her dialogue is the most particular and idiosyncratic in American literature, as peculiar and condensed as speech in jokes and dreams. I loved and respected Paul Bowles’s The Sheltering Sky, ‘He of the Assembly,’ and ‘Pages from Cold Point.’ But Jane Bowles’s novel shifted the ground for me—she made the world of writing move. Move over and sigh.” — Lynne Tillman, Nothing is Lost or Found
@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook

Some love for Lynne Tillman’s amazing essay about Jane and Paul Bowles that we excerpted from What Would Lynne Tillman Do?

writersnoonereads:

"[Jane Bowles’] novel, Two Serious Ladies, was a revelation—a work of genius, unique, subversive. These terms are overused, and usually misused, but are true of this audacious, brilliantly written novel, this masquerade, comedy, tragedy, with its anarchic, singular views of sexuality, marriage, femininity, masculinity, American culture, exoticism. Jane Bowles ignored the worn lines between conscious and unconscious life; she beggared the realist novel with writing indifferent to prosaic notions of reality. Her dialogue is the most particular and idiosyncratic in American literature, as peculiar and condensed as speech in jokes and dreams. I loved and respected Paul Bowles’s The Sheltering Sky, ‘He of the Assembly,’ and ‘Pages from Cold Point.’ But Jane Bowles’s novel shifted the ground for me—she made the world of writing move. Move over and sigh.” — Lynne Tillman, Nothing is Lost or Found

@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook

Some love for Lynne Tillman’s amazing essay about Jane and Paul Bowles that we excerpted from What Would Lynne Tillman Do?


Mathilde seemed, on the contrary, like something easy and lithe—a bunch of mellifluous and distinct clauses: pretty and sweet and funny and gentle and happy and young and not me and not Ryan and not work and not real. 

The inner lives of literary translators in Sara Freeman’s complex, sexy story on Joyland, L’histoire de Mathilde.  

Mathilde seemed, on the contrary, like something easy and lithe—a bunch of mellifluous and distinct clauses: pretty and sweet and funny and gentle and happy and young and not me and not Ryan and not work and not real. 

The inner lives of literary translators in Sara Freeman’s complex, sexy story on Joyland, L’histoire de Mathilde.  

(Source: renee-french)

the-overlook-hotel:

At the beginning of The Shining, when Jack calls Wendy to tell her he got the job as winter caretaker of the Overlook, she sits in front of a painting of a woman holding a dog. The painting is titled “Woman and Terrier” (1963) by Canadian artist Alex Colville.

Colville’s paintings are often described as having a subtly unsettling quality, which is perhaps why Kubrick chose to feature them in The Shining.

Colville died in 2013 at the age of 92. After his passing, his son, Graham, remarked:

“I must say, I (felt) slight surprise when I saw Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining and I suddenly realized my father’s paintings were in the background in numerous scenes. They were implanted in that film as almost subliminal messages.“

Another of Colville’s paintings can be seen in the same Boulder apartment, and yet another can be seen at the Overlook, near the end of the film. A fourth hangs in Room 237.

Never knew Alex Colville was part of The Shining's visual grammar!